Advance your career with flexible study

The Master of Arts in Counselling Psychology (MACP) at Yorkville University is a rewarding practicum-based program that prepares you to become a registered counsellor or psychotherapist.

Recognized by the College of Registered Psychotherapists of Ontario (CRPO) and meeting the educational requirements for many other provincial and national associations, the program helps graduates to make a difference in people’s lives.

The comprehensive curriculum, which you can study from home or at work, covers a variety of topics, including theories of personality, counselling methodologies and psychotherapeutic interventions, crisis and trauma in counselling, addiction counselling, guidance and counselling in schools, and assessment.

Delivery

100 percent Online*

Start Dates

January, May, September

Duration

2.5 years

*Does not include the required practicum placement that is normally completed in 30 weeks at the end of the program. The practicum is supervised by a registered counsellor or psychotherapist and allows students to integrate theory with practice and develop valuable counselling experience. For comprehensive, up-to-date information about the MACP program, please view the Academic Calendar.

Yorkville University offers a Master of Arts in Counselling Psychology that is designated in New Brunswick and delivered online.

The MACP helped me immensely during a difficult time. I look forward to using what I learned in this program to help the people around me in a way that I could not do before.

 

Fatemeh Heshmati
Master of Arts in Counselling Psychology Valedictorian ‘17

Registered Psychotherapist

Program Features

Flexible schedule

Balance work, home and study demands with a flexible, online course schedule and study at your own pace.

Choose to take courses as your busy life permits and study during the day, evenings or on the weekends.

Accelerated degree

Earn your degree in 2.5 years or less with a full course load and approved transfer credits from previous university and college graduate courses.

Graduate faster compared to balancing traditional on-campus programs with your busy life.

Experienced faculty

World-class professional faculty who are recognized clinical experts and are dedicated to helping students achieve their career goals.

Get advice about professional designation prerequisities and career advancement and networking opportunities.

Practical focus

The rigorous program provides invaluable experience with a practicum placement under the supervision of a faculty member.

Become a registered counsellor or psychotherapist and join an established alumni network of professionals across Canada.

YORKVILLE UNIVERSITY ADVANTAGE

For people who know what they want in life, both personally and professionally, Yorkville University offers programs aimed at achieving those goals. Yorkville University engages with people where they are in life and helps to get them where they want to be. Online or in class, across Canada, Yorkville programs are flexible, fast-paced and, above all else, lead to transformation through education.

flexible learning

Flexibility

Balance your studies and personal life with a flexible course load and choice of online or on-campus classes.

Accelerated Degrees

By allowing you to continue your studies year-round, with no forced breaks, studying at Yorkville gives you the opportunity to graduate faster. We also provide optimum credit transfers based on your previous learning.

Year-Round Start Dates

Start your program as soon as you are ready with various start dates throughout the year.

resources & support

Student Assistance

Get the support you need from program advisors and student services staff committed to helping you achieve your academic and career goals.

Tutoring Support

Yorkville’s Learning Success Centre is available online for quick help and study resources, including 24/7 tutoring.

Writing Lab

APA and writing tutoring services are available to assist students with academic writing.

Enhanced Learning

Small Class Sizes

Get personalized attention in an average class size of 20 students and learn through active participation.

Networking

Build lifelong relationships with students and professors as part of teamwork, discussions and assignments.

Experienced Faculty

Benefit from the knowledge of Yorkville faculty who have years of experience in their respective fields, and can use that expertise to help you achieve your own career goals.

Professional Designations

Career Outcomes

Graduates of the Master of Arts in Counselling Psychology program use their skills and knowledge to help people overcome psychological issues and transform their lives.

A variety of exciting and fulfilling outcomes are available to graduates of this program, including careers such as:

  • Counsellor
  • Therapist
  • Psychometrist
  • Consultant
  • Psychotherapist
  • Mental Health Service Provider
  • Psychological Researcher
  • Behavioural Researcher

Christine Hakkola

Build Your Private Practice

Psychotherapist, Life Coach and Business Mentor

Sandra Joy

The Power of You

Psychotherapist, Clinical Traumatologist, Certified Coach and Owner

Juliann Rasanayagam

Psychotherapist, Anger Specialist, author DIY Anger Kit: Create your own Anger Management Toolkit

Marie Reinsborough-Wadden

IRIS Community Counselling & Consulting

Co-Founder and Clinical Therapist

Meet the Dean

“If you are ready to make a difference in people’s lives, the MACP program can be one of the most rewarding experiences in your career.”

Peter Hall, Ph.D. RP LCT ACS CCC
Campus Provost & Vice President Academic (NB)

Meet Some of Your Master of Arts in Counselling Psychology Faculty

Rochelle Collings, M.A.

Associate Director Field Training

John McLaughlin, Ed.D.

Dean Emeritus

Peter Hall, Ph.D. RP LCT ACS CCC

Campus Provost & Vice President Academic (NB)

New Brunswick Faculty of Behavioural Sciences

Sarah Stewart-Spencer, Ph.D.

Associate Dean, Academic Operations

Faculty of Behavioural Sciences

David Chapman, PsyD

Associate Dean, Field Training

Faculty of Behavioural Sciences

Elaine Baltzer, Ph.D.

Helen Massfeller

Mircea Alexander Munteanu

Course Description

The rigorous curriculum of the Master of Arts in Counselling Psychology includes the following courses:

  • PSYC 6104 A Biopsychosocial Approach to Counselling

      The biopsychosocial approach is applicable to health/mental health disciplines including psychology, social work, nursing, and medicine. This course examines the application of a biopsychosocial model to professional counselling psychology. It looks at both the need for it, and its systems and ethical foundations in the Canadian context. The course considers a biopsychosocial approach to assessment, treatment, outcomes evaluation, and prevention. To illustrate, it examines biopsychosocial factors contributing to development and treatment/management of selected counselling problems, such as anxiety and depression, with particular emphasis on neurocognitive factors often underemphasized in traditional counselling approaches to these problems.

      (4 credits) (required)

  • PSYC 6113 Theories of Personality

      This course is a survey of the field of personality. Topics will include psychometric and assessment concerns. The course will cover the classics of personality theory such as the Psychoanalytic, Behavioural and Humanistic. This course will also cover the modern perspectives of Cognitive, Trait, and Positive Psychology.

      (3 credits) (required)

  • PSYC 6123 Psychological Assessment

      This course provides students with an understanding of the concepts and principles involved in psychological assessment and the use of both standardized and non-standardized instruments. Students will learn the concepts involved in psychological assessment, educational testing, and evaluation. The course will also examine the effects of clinical assessment on clients. Counsellors must become knowledgeable users of assessment data in the clinical decision-making process. Students will develop their skills for selecting, administering, scoring, interpreting, and analyzing test data in a clinical setting. Also, they will familiarize themselves with psychometric instruments, their philosophical and statistical properties, and the pros and cons of various assessment approaches. The course will also address cultural diversity issues and teach students how to approach social and ethical issues in assessment.

      (3 credits) (required)

  • PSYC 6153 Counselling Methodologies – Psychodynamic and Humanistic Modalities

      Counselling Methodologies: Psychodynamic and Humanistic Modalities is a review of the most important contemporary psychodynamic and humanistic approaches of counselling and psychotherapy, focusing on: underlying philosophical assumptions, major concepts, views of personality, the therapeutic process, the counsellor’s role, typical interventions, and targeted outcomes. The current approaches to counselling and psychotherapy selected for this course will also be explored with respect to the relations between theorists and their theories, as well as between counsellors and their clients. Cross-cultural and gender-related aspects will be considered for each of the counselling schools under study. Students will endeavour to recognize the links between theory and practice, between constructs and applied techniques or interventions. Students will integrate the course material from: the textbook, supplementary articles, professor’s notes, and online class discussions. Students will also be encouraged to conduct their own further research on topics of interest, by accessing library resources and pertinent professional Internet sites. Students will examine the similarities and differences among approaches, and thus lay the foundation for the development of a personally meaningful approach to counselling.

      (3 credits) (required)

  • PSYC 6163 Counselling Methodologies – Behavioural and Cognitive Modalities

      This course is a continuation of PSYC 6153, with an examination of some of the core theories and methods which influence and direct the practices of contemporary psychotherapy. Cognitive behavioural therapy, one of the most commonly utilized therapeutic models will be looked at in detail. Additionally, structured training exercises in basic interviewing/counselling skills will be presented. An overview of emerging evidence concerning factors common to all therapies will also be reviewed.

      (3 credits) (required)

  • PSYC 6203 Ethical Standards for Mental Health Service Providers

      Course content follows the standards for ethical conduct and practice set by the Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association. In general, topics covered include the scope of practice issues, professional responsibility, privacy and confidentiality, record keeping, appropriate relationships during and after treatment (including sexual intimacies), third party relationships and responsibilities, advertising, continuing professional education, and interruption and termination of treatment. Issues of disaster response, electronic or telephonic delivery of service, child protection, and guidelines for the treatment of gay, lesbian, and bisexual clients will also be considered.

      (3 credits) (required)

  • PSYC 6213 Research Methodology

      This course provides students of counselling with the tools needed to critically review and evaluate scientific research and develop the basic elements of a research proposal. Students will explore the body of counselling research, critique selected studies, and develop elementary research design skills, thereby gaining a sound understanding of the scientific method and the ethical considerations bearing on the research process. Strong familiarity with the scientific method allows professionals to understand psychological research and integrate it with daily practice. The scientific method can best be learned by studying all aspects of scientific research, including basic design, implementation, interpretation of results, and the drawing of conclusions.

      (3 credits) (required)

  • PSYC 6223 Group Counselling

      Groups are becoming increasingly popular in counselling interventions. Although this trend is partly driven by budget restrictions, the primary advantage of group counselling is that participants get the opportunity to learn from each other. Other benefits from group counselling include that groups can more closely resemble everyday circumstances, they help to build a sense of community and belonginess, they normalize “issues” as members find commonalities with others, and, especially in working through interpersonal challenges, they can be very therapeutic. This course will take a multimedia approach to introducing group counselling skills across diverse theoretical perspectives, ages and stages of development, and types of problems. A comprehensive textbook, bundled with a DVD, presents theory, practical applications, and numerous role-played examples of group facilitation skills. Journal articles, video clips from YouTube, interactive discussion forums, and assignments, focusing on group counselling for diverse ages, issues, and specific populations will all enhance students’ learning in this course. Students will be expected to actively participate in e- groups (asynchronous and/or synchronous) during this course and critically examine their own experiences both as group members and facilitators. Through the skills practice, students are expected to demonstrate awareness of group specific ethical concerns (e.g., limits to ensuring confidentiality) and enhance their basic group facilitation and group counselling competencies, including active listening, non-verbal communication, problem-solving, deepening focus, cutting off, drawing out, role-playing, closing, and the use of dyads and rounds.

      (3 credits) (required)

  • PSYC 6246 Counselling Skills and Competencies

      This course provides students the opportunity to learn basic counselling skills and competencies essential to initiating and maintaining relationships with clients, regardless of specific theoretical orientation. Students engage in case conceptualization using one of four theoretical perspectives (Person-Centred Therapy; Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy; Structural Family Therapy; or Solution-Focused Therapy) and apply this theoretical approach in a counselling session with a client. By means of weekly structured practice assignments students learn how to identify and conduct competent counselling interviews. (Note: Students must earn at least 70% on each graded component of this course. Even if a student’s overall grade in the course is 70% or higher, if a grade on any component of the course is below 70%, s/he will be required to repeat the course.)

      (6 credits) (required)

  • PSYC 6253 Applying Cognitive-Behavioural Interventions

      This course will focus on the application of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). In particular, it provides a step-by-step process for understanding CBT theory, applying that theory to practice, developing goals for therapy, and building skills in working with clients. 80 PSYC6263 Couples and Family Systems (3 credits) (required) This course is designed to provide the student with the skills and competencies necessary to effectively deal with the interpersonal and intrapersonal dynamics of intimate relationships and family systems. Family interaction and communication patterns, conflict resolution, the impact of children on relationships, and other factors that influence family systems will be introduced. Ethical considerations regarding intimate partner violence/domestic abuse will be considered. The two major written assignments will focus in depth on one or more of the theoretical family systems frameworks covered in this course.

      (3 credits) (required)

  • PSYC 6273 Cultural Diversity in Counselling

      The cultural differences among people must be taken into account when structuring counselling interventions. Identity formation, worldview, communication style, and acculturation will be studied from the perspective of the significant cultural minorities found in Canada. Multicultural competence does not just guide interventions, it permeates all interpersonal dynamics among individuals of different gender, age, sexual orientation, race, cultural membership, able-bodied status, etc. This course is designed to enhance students’ understanding of the role of personal, ethnic, social, and cultural factors in multicultural counselling and mental health service delivery. Multicultural competence does not just guide interventions, it permeates all interpersonal dynamics among individuals of different, gender, age, sexual orientation, race, cultural membership, able-bodied status, etc.

      (3 credits) (required)

  • PSYC 6333 Psychopathology for Counsellors

      Psychopathology is the study of disturbed functioning in the areas of cognition, emotion, and behaviour. It is composed of five aspects: definition of the disorder with regards to symptoms (diagnosis), description of the typical course of the disorder (prognosis), identification of the incidence of the disorder (epidemiology), understanding the origin of the disorder (etiology), and identifying appropriate treatments for the disorder. This course will focus on the major adult mental disorders. In the context of these disorders, the diathesis-stress model of etiology will be an important focus. Diathesis-stress is a dimensional approach that locates psychopathology at an extreme region on a dimension ranging from psychological health to severe illness. In the context of this model, recent developments in the fields of emotion science and emotion regulation will be emphasized as insights from these areas have major implications for the clinical work of counsellors, even where the degree of distress does not reach that of a specific disorder. It is important to note that counsellors are not permitted to diagnose in most jurisdictions. However, a basic understanding of the major categories of disorders is essential to providing counselling and therapy as well as for treatment planning, interpretation of referrals, participation in discussions with other mental health professions, and in making referrals where appropriate.

      (3 credits) (elective)

  • PSYC 6353 Addiction Counselling

      This course provides an introduction to the assessment and treatment of addictions. Emphasis will be placed on examining the various methods, strategies, and techniques used to assess addictions, as well as other problem areas that may co-exist or underlie addictions. Emphasis will also be placed on examining the various psychotherapeutic modalities and approaches, as well as the various treatment setting options.

      (3 credits) (elective)

  • PSYC 6373 Counselling in School Environments

      The presence of school guidance counsellors is being increasingly recognized by school boards as an integral component of the personal, social, educational, and career development of students. Promoting healthy relationships, addressing social problems, and facilitating career choices within a multicultural environment are central to a comprehensive guidance program. This course is designed to help students identify and prepare for the multiple roles of a school guidance counsellor in meeting the needs of a diverse population. Issues such as bullying, violence, and substance abuse will be examined as well as the roles of parents, administration, educators, and community members in the context of the school environment.

      (3 credits) (elective)

  • PSYC 6383 Crisis and Trauma Counselling

      This course is designed to provide graduate students in the counselling psychology program with both a theoretical and practical understanding of issues surrounding trauma and a basic introduction into accepted approaches to working with clients who have experienced trauma in their lives. Using current available research literature, this course will introduce students to the definition and types of trauma, critical incident stress management/debriefing (CISM/CISD), client resourcing and stabilization (ethical considerations), theoretical frameworks, assessments/diagnosis, effective treatments/interventions, prevention, and therapist self-care (vicarious trauma). Assisting students in understanding what trauma looks like and introducing them to different approaches where they can get further training, will better equip them to recognize their own limits and help clients. This course will help them navigate the vast amount of information on the treatment of trauma, so that they can make informed ethically-sound decisions when working with clients commensurate with understanding.

      (3 credits) (elective)

  • PSYC 7100 Orientation to the Practicum

      In this required four-part non-credit course, practicum expectations are introduced and explored. Students begin to develop practicum specific resumes and cover letters and set specific learning goals for their practicum. The pre-practicum series of courses is designed to expose students to progressive sets of information preparing them for their practicum search, practicum application, the 7106 course, on-site practicum experience, and entry to practice. This course is supplemental to the course work completed during the MACP program; each of the four parts enriches and enhances students’ learning and contributes to their readiness for the practicum and a new career as a counsellor. The course begins in students’ second trimester and continues to the end of their fifth trimester. Students engage in a variety of activities including attending live office hours, reviewing narrated PowerPoints and questions submitted to the various Ask Questions forums, and monitoring Course Bulletins & News posts from the Field Training (FT) team.

      PSYC7100 is presented over four trimesters. Each trimester focuses on specific themes.

      • PSYC7100A –Planning for Practicum: Delivered and completed when students are in trimester two (T2) of the MACP program;
      • PSYC7100B –Professionalism in the Counselling Profession: Delivered and completed when students are in trimester three (T3) of the MACP program; 82
      • PSYC7100C –Supervision and Counselling Competencies: Delivered and completed when students are in trimester four (T4) of the MACP program; and
      • PSYC7100D –Submitting a Successful Practicum Application Package: Delivered and completed when students are in trimester five (T5) of the MACP program.

      Students must complete each section of PSYC7100 during the trimester prescribed to ensure they will be ready to begin practicum on time. Students will not be allowed to defer any portion of PSYC7100 unless they take one full trimester of course work off.

      (0 credits) (required)

  • PSYC 7106 Practicum

      This course is designed to support students during their practicum placement and enrich their learning experience. It also provides an opportunity to more formally evaluate students’ counselling competencies, ensuring that graduation from the MACP program signifies readiness to work effectively as a counsellor. There will be a focus on integrating theory with practice, resolving ethical dilemmas, case conceptualization and planning, developing cultural competency, embracing diversity, working collaboratively across disciplines, accessing and maximizing the benefits of site supervision, and developing a professional identity as a counsellor. Topics and resources will be closely connected to those previously introduced throughout the program to provide opportunities to synthesize and apply students’ learning – this spiral approach will facilitate a deeper level of experiential learning and retention. (Note: Students must earn at least 70% on each graded component of this course. Even if a student’s overall grade in the course is 70% or higher, if a grade on any component of the course is below 70%, s/he will be required to repeat the course.)

      (6 credits) (required)

Practicum

The rigorous practicum consists of approximately 13 hours per week for 30 weeks. The practicum is normally completed over two 15-week terms. In total, the practicum involves 400 hours of counselling experience in a professional counselling setting, including 200 hours of direct, supervised contact with clients.

After completing 14 academic courses with a minimum cumulative grade point average of B (3.0), students are eligible to begin their practicum. Students are responsible for finding a suitable practicum site, although Yorkville University’s Faculty of Behavioural Sciences is available to assist. Practicum settings and eligible on-site supervisors must be approved by the Faculty of Behavioural Sciences prior to commencement of the practicum.

The practicum experience takes place within the context of a course (PSYC 7106) led by a member of the faculty. Students complete a number of self-directed learning modules related to the practice of counselling psychology, participate in 12 live seminars, engage in individual supervision with a faculty supervisor, and prepare a multi-staged case analysis.

Admission Requirements

Yorkville University’s Master of Arts in Counselling Psychology program is 100 percent online except the required practicum placement, which is completed towards the end of the program.

The MACP Online degree is administratively offered by our Fredericton campus.

Applicants to the MACP program are required to provide the following:

  • Official undergraduate transcript and proof of obtainment of a bachelor’s degree*
  • Resume and statement of interest
  • Detailed course descriptions if applying for transfer credit consideration
  • Two letters of reference from professional or academic sources
  • Completed online application
  • Application fee of $75 (CAD)

*All official transcripts need to be sealed, stamped and sent directly from the issuing institution to our Admissions Services Department for evaluation.

In addition, applicants are required to have:

  • A cumulative grade point average (CGPA) in undergraduate study of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 or 4.3 scale, or a GPA of at least 3.0 in the final two years of study. Applicants may be conditionally admitted with a GPA between 2.5 and 2.99 if strength of overall application is sufficient.

Preference will be given to students who have successfully completed undergraduate courses amounting to either a major or minor in psychology, related social sciences, or allied health professions such as social work.

Yorkville University reserves the right to refuse admission and ask admitted students to withdraw from the program in special circumstances.

For full details of admissions requirements, please see the Academic Calendar.

English Language Requirements

English is the primary language of instruction at Yorkville University.

Applicants who have obtained a bachelor’s or first professional degree in a language other than English are required to submit confirmation of an official test of ability to work and study in English:

Proof of obtaining any other degree or diploma at the post-secondary education level where the primary language of instruction was English.

  • Confirmation of a Canadian Academic English Language – Computer edition (CAEL-CE) with a score of at least 70.
  • Confirmation of an official Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 92 (Internet-based version).
  • Confirmation of a Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) overall score of 8 with no component below 8.
  • Confirmation of an International English Language Test System (IELTS) overall band score of at least 7.0 with no band below 6.5.
  • Confirmation of a Canadian Test of English for Scholars and Trainees (CanTest) with a minimum overall bandwidth of 4.5.
  • Confirmation of a score on any other test of English language proficiency that equates to Level C1 or higher of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).
  • Confirmation of a score equivalent to these scores on another test of English language proficiency recognized by and acceptable to the University.
  • Confirmation of a Duolingo minimum score of 115.

The University reserves the right to refuse admission to any student whose proficiency of English is questionable and to ask any student whose written work is below acceptable standards to withdraw from the program.

Tuition & Fees

The total cost for the Master of Arts in Counselling Psychology degree program is $37,730.*

The MACP program runs throughout the year, which is divided into three academic terms, starting in September, January and May. Students must complete 49 study credits, including 43 study credits obtained through academic courses and six study credits obtained through a supervised practicum. A typical course is three study credits.

Total program tuition may vary based on actual credit transfers and course equivalencies. Below are sample calculations depending on the number of courses taken per term.

Trimester Credits Credits per hour Fees
One 7 $770 $5390
Two 9 $770 $6,930
Three 9 $770 $6,930
Four 9 $770 $6,930
Five 9 $770 $6,930
Practicum Course 6 $770 $4,620

*As of 2019 – 2020. Tuition and fees subject to change.

Tuition Payment

Arrangements for payment of tuition must be made at least two weeks prior to the start of each term (please see the Academic Schedule for deadlines). Monthly payment arrangements can also be made. Please contact our Bursar’s Office for more details at 1-888-886-1882. 

Please contact an Admissions Advisor to learn more about financial aid options. 

Other Fees

Please note that costs do not include other fees such as textbooks, expendable supplies, equipment and resource fees. All fees and charges are quoted in Canadian dollars (CAD). Yorkville University also accepts equivalent payment in other currencies.

For further information about tuition, fees and payment methods, please contact Yorkville University’s Bursar’s Office. Tuition rates are confirmed three months prior to the start of each term. Changes to tuition rates will be announced at least three months prior to the start of the term to which they apply. Current tuition rates are available on the Yorkville University website or from the Bursar’s Office at 1-888-886-1882.

Financial Aid Types

Scholarships & Bursaries

Yorkville University provides a limited number of scholarships and bursaries to qualified students.

Learn More

Financial Aid

Yorkville University is committed to helping students find affordable solutions to finance their education investment.

Learn More

Partnerships

Special tuition bursaries and military training credit transfer options are offered to current and former Canadian Forces members and their families.

FAQ

  • 1. Why should I choose the Master of Arts in Counselling Psychology program?

      The online master’s degree program, which is designed to be completed in 28 months, helps you gain professional designation requirements and advance your career in counselling, psychotherapy, education or social work.  

      Students develop invaluable professional experience and networking opportunities with experienced faculty and peers, including opportunities for role-playing and a practicum placement.

      If you are looking to make a difference in people’s lives, the rigorous program can be fulfilling personally and professionally. 

  • 2. Can I do this program while working full time?

      Yes. The program was specifically designed for working professionals. Approximately 80 percent of our students work full time while completing their degree. However, a reduction in working hours may be required during the practicum portion of the program, which is not online.

  • 3. How much time will I need to dedicate to each course?

      Students can expect to dedicate approximately 25 to 30 hours per week to successfully complete the requirements for each academic course.

  • 4. Do I need to have a bachelor’s degree with a major in Psychology to apply?

      No. Although academic experience in Psychology is preferred, it is not a requirement. If you hold a bachelor’s degree with a B average, you are eligible to apply. The first Master of Arts in Counselling Psychology course is ten weeks long and will provide you with an introduction to psychotherapy and counselling.

  • 5. How do terms and courses work?

      For the Master of Arts in Counselling Psychology program, there are three terms per year: Fall (beginning in September), Winter (beginning in January), and Spring (beginning in May). Each term is 15 weeks long and courses are either five weeks long or ten weeks long.

      Courses are taken sequentially and not concurrently, although the latter may be possible with special permission. A term would consist of either one ten-week course and a five-week course or three five-week courses. 

  • 6. Are there breaks between terms or courses?

      There is a two-to-three-week break in between terms. However, within a term, there are no breaks between courses.

  • 7. What is involved in completing the practicum?

      The rigorous practicum consists of 400 hours of counselling experience in a professional counselling setting. Two hundred of the hours involve direct, supervised contact with clients. The practicum is normally completed over two fifteen-week terms. 

      Students are responsible for finding a suitable practicum site, although Yorkville University’s Faculty of Behavioural Sciences is available to assist. Practicum settings and eligible on-site supervisors must be approved by the Faculty of Behavioural Sciences prior to commencement of the practicum.

      The practicum experience takes place within the context of a course led by a member of the faculty. Students complete a number of self-directed learning modules related to the practice of counselling psychology, participate in 12 live seminars, engage in individual supervision with a faculty supervisor, and prepare a multi-staged case analysis.

  • 8. How much does the Master of Arts in Counselling Psychology program cost?

      Please see here for current tuition rates. Yorkville University is committed to helping you evaluate different financial aid options and payment schedules. Please contact an Admissions Advisor for more information.

  • 9. What is the application process for the Master of Arts in Counselling Psychology program?

  • 10. What are the demographics of the classes?

      Most students in the Master of Arts in Counselling Psychology program are aged 25 to 44 years old and are working professionals with significant experience in counselling or counselling-related work or studies. Nearly all students are passionate about making a difference in people’s lives.

  • 11. Is Yorkville approved to offer the Master of Arts in Counselling Psychology degree?

      Yes. Yorkville University has been approved to offer the Master of Arts in Counselling Psychology degree by the Government of New Brunswick.

  • 12. What IELTS or TOEFL score do I need to be accepted?

      For more information on the minimum English language requirements, please contact an Admissions Advisor

  • 13. Does Yorkville University offer any scholarships?

      Yorkville University is committed to helping you evaluate different financial aid options and payment schedules. Please contact an Admissions Advisor for more information.

  • 14. Can I apply for Canadian provincial student loans?

      Only domestic students can apply to Canadian provincial student loan programs such as the Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP), New Brunswick Student Loans (NBSL) or StudentAid BC.

      Yorkville University is committed to helping you evaluate different financial aid options and payment schedules. Please contact an Admissions Advisor for more information.

  • 15. What if I have more questions?

      If you can’t find your questions addressed on this web page, please contact an Admissions Advisor.

TAKE THE NEXT STEP

For more information, contact an Admissions Advisor.

 

Contact Admissions

For Yorkville University’s Terms of Service and other legal Information, please click here.